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Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing

, Volume 18, Issue 3, pp 371–381 | Cite as

A formal framework to integrate express data models in an extended enterprise context

  • Omar López-Ortega
  • Moramay Ramírez-Hernández
Article

Abstract

The paper describes a formal framework to integrate EXPRESS models and facilitate sharing and exchanging of data in an Extended Enterprise context. We perceive in the creation of an Extended Enterprise an opportunity to use standardized data models. Hence our research is based on three important ISO standards whose primary objective is to enhance data exchange. These standards are ISO 10303, ISO 15531 and ISO 13584, known as STEP, MANDATE and PLIB, respectively. Although they are intended to overcome incompatibility problems for the computer-based applications that are used during the product life-cycle, they turned out to be semantically incompatible among themselves. This seems to be a major drawback when individual organizations want to share core competences, such as resources, manufacturing processes, or product design, to create an Extended Enterprise. The constructs we propose harmonize incompatible model components so that core competences can be transparent to the net of enterprises. The proposal is exemplified by creating a mediator application and a repository. The mediator application is used by individual firms to gain access to the core abilities that are shared, whereas the repository is a neutral means to store such competences. It complies with part 21 of the ISO 10303 standard. The proposed formal framework provides a sound model of the information system and facilitates data sharing in the Extended Enterprise.

Keywords

STEP MANDATE and PLIB standards EXPRESS models Extended Enterprise Formal Framework Data sharing and exchanging 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Omar López-Ortega
    • 1
  • Moramay Ramírez-Hernández
    • 1
  1. 1.Centro de Investigación en Tecnologías de Información y Sistemas, Instituto de Ciencias Básicas e IngenieríaUniversidad Autónoma del Estado de HidalgoPachucaMéxico

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