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Journal of Intelligent Information Systems

, Volume 48, Issue 1, pp 117–140 | Cite as

A just-in-time keyword extraction from meeting transcripts using temporal and participant information

  • Hyun-Je Song
  • Junho Go
  • Seong-Bae Park
  • Se-Young Park
  • Kweon Yang Kim
Article

Abstract

In a meeting, it is often desirable to extract the keywords from each utterance as soon as it is spoken. Therefore, this paper proposes a just-in-time keyword extraction from meeting transcripts. The proposed method considers three major factors that make it different from keyword extraction from normal texts. The first factor is the temporal history of the preceding utterances that grants higher importance to recent utterances than older ones, and the second is topic relevance, which focuses only on the preceding utterances relevant to the current utterance. The final factor is the participants. The utterances spoken by the current speaker should be considered more important than those spoken by other participants. The proposed method considers these factors simultaneously under a graph-based keyword extraction with some graph operations. Experiments on two data sets in English and Korean show that consideration of these factors results in improved performance in keyword extraction from meeting transcripts.

Keywords

Just-In-Time keyword extraction Graph-Based keyword extraction Forgetting curve Keyword extraction from meeting transcripts 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the BK21 Plus project (SW Human Resource Development Program for Supporting Smart Life) funded by the Ministry of Education, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Kyungpook National University, Korea (21A20131600005).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyun-Je Song
    • 1
  • Junho Go
    • 1
  • Seong-Bae Park
    • 1
  • Se-Young Park
    • 1
  • Kweon Yang Kim
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Computer Science and EngineeringKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Department of Computer EngineeringKyungil UniversityGyeongbukRepublic of Korea

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