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Journal of Family and Economic Issues

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 90–108 | Cite as

Wealth Holdings and Portfolio Allocation of the Elderly: The Role of Marital History

  • Aydogan Ulker
Original Paper

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of marital history in terms of explaining differences in wealth holdings and portfolio allocation of older individuals by studying data from the first wave of Health and Retirement Study which was conducted in 1992. The results generally suggest that both men and women suffer from the negative shocks of past marital dissolutions in terms of household wealth accumulation. The significance level, however, differs across currently married couples, single males, and single females. The examination of the asset components of net worth also indicates that both the probability of owning a particular asset and the fraction of wealth allocated to that asset might vary depending on the elderly individuals’ marital history.

Keywords

Wealth Portfolio allocation Elderly Marital history 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Accounting, Economics and FinanceDeakin UniversityBurwoodAustralia

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