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Journal of Computational Neuroscience

, Volume 31, Issue 3, pp 615–623 | Cite as

Mechanism of conduction block in amphibian myelinated axon induced by biphasic electrical current at ultra-high frequency

  • Changfeng Tai
  • Dong Guo
  • Jicheng Wang
  • James R. Roppolo
  • William C. de Groat
Article

Abstract

The mechanism of axonal conduction block induced by ultra-high frequency (≥20 kHz) biphasic electrical current was investigated using a lumped circuit model of the amphibian myelinated axon based on Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) equations. The ultra-high frequency stimulation produces constant activation of both sodium and potassium channels at the axonal node under the block electrode causing the axonal conduction block. This blocking mechanism is different from the mechanism when the stimulation frequency is between 4 kHz and 10 kHz, where only the potassium channel is constantly activated. The minimal stimulation intensity required to induce a conduction block increases as the stimulation frequency increases. The results from this simulation study are useful to guide future animal experiments to reveal the different mechanisms underlying nerve conduction block induced by high-frequency biphasic electrical current.

Keywords

Axon Electrical stimulation High frequency Model Nerve block 

Notes

Acknowledgement

This work is supported by the NIH under grants DK-068566, DK-090006, DK-077783, and by Christopher and Dana Reeve Foundation.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Changfeng Tai
    • 1
  • Dong Guo
    • 2
  • Jicheng Wang
    • 1
  • James R. Roppolo
    • 3
  • William C. de Groat
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of UrologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Department of Biomedical EngineeringCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pharmacology and Chemical BiologyUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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