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Journal of Computer-Aided Materials Design

, Volume 14, Supplement 1, pp 265–293 | Cite as

A systems-based approach for integrated design of materials, products and design process chains

  • Jitesh H. Panchal
  • Hae-Jin Choi
  • Janet K. Allen
  • David L. McDowell
  • Farrokh Mistree
Article

Abstract

The concurrent design of materials and products provides designers with flexibility to achieve design objectives that were not previously accessible. However, the improved flexibility comes at a cost of increased complexity of the design process chains and the materials simulation models used for executing the design chains. Efforts to reduce the complexity generally result in increased uncertainty. We contend that a systems based approach is essential for managing both the complexity and the uncertainty in design process chains and simulation models in concurrent material and product design. Our approach is based on simplifying the design process chains systematically such that the resulting uncertainty does not significantly affect the overall system performance. Similarly, instead of striving for accurate models for multiscale systems (that are inherently complex), we rely on making design decisions that are robust to uncertainties in the models. Accordingly, we pursue hierarchical modeling in the context of design of multiscale systems. In this paper our focus is on design process chains. We present a systems based approach, premised on the assumption that complex systems can be designed efficiently by managing the complexity of design process chains. The approach relies on (a) the use of reusable interaction patterns to model design process chains, and (b) consideration of design process decisions using value-of-information based metrics. The approach is illustrated using a Multifunctional Energetic Structural Material (MESM) design example. Energetic materials store considerable energy which can be released through shock-induced detonation; conventionally, they are not engineered for strength properties. The design objectives for the MESM in this paper include both sufficient strength and energy release characteristics. The design is carried out by using models at different length and time scales that simulate different aspects of the system. Finally, by applying the method to the MESM design problem, we show that the integrated design of materials and products can be carried out more efficiently by explicitly accounting for design process decisions with the hierarchy of models.

Keywords

Multiscale materials design Design processes Improvement potential Energetic structural materials 

Nomenclature

Umin

Lower bound on expected utility

Umax

Upper bound on expected utility

α

Coefficient of pessimism, measuring decision maker’s aversion to risk

PI

Improvement potential

(Umin)*

Lower bound on expected payoff at decision point

(Umax)*

Upper bound on expected payoff at decision point

Ui

Utility of ith design goal

\({d_{i}^{-}}\)

Underachievement of utility compared to the target value of 1

\({d_{i}^{+}}\)

Overachievement of utility compared to the target value

ki

Weight assigned to the ith goal

accFe

Accumulated mass fraction of Iron

SizeAl

Size of aluminum particles

SizeFe2O3

Size of iron oxide particles

SizeVoids

Size of voids

VF voids

Volume fraction of voids

RadFilling

Amount of MESM stored in the container

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jitesh H. Panchal
    • 1
  • Hae-Jin Choi
    • 2
  • Janet K. Allen
    • 1
  • David L. McDowell
    • 1
  • Farrokh Mistree
    • 1
  1. 1.The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical EngineeringGeorgia Institute of TechnologyAtlantaUSA
  2. 2.School of Mechanical and Aerospace EngineeringNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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