Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 25, Issue 2, pp 133–184 | Cite as

Bioarchaeology and the Skeletons of the Pre-Columbian Maya

Article

Abstract

This review explores the past two decades of research on ancient Maya skeletons. The focus is on how this work has contributed to our understanding of health, diet, social change, inequality, migration and mobility, war, violence, and ritual practice, with special attention given to recent methodological developments and debates in the bioarchaeology of the Maya. This review essay highlights the most recent findings in the bioarchaeology of the Maya and how those results were achieved. The essay concludes with suggestions for future research and highlights areas of potential collaboration that have been underutilized to address broader anthropological questions.

Keywords

Maya Demography Health Diet Mobility Embodiment Violence Ritual practice 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyBrown UniversityProvidenceUSA

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