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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 23, Issue 3, pp 263–323 | Cite as

Current Research on the Historical Development of Northern Iroquoian Societies

  • Jennifer Birch
Article

Abstract

The archaeological record of Northern Iroquoian peoples contributes to global questions about ethnogenesis, the emergence of settled village life, agricultural intensification, the development of complex organizational structures, and processes of cultural and colonial entanglement. In the last decade, the rapid accumulation of data and the application of contemporary theoretical perspectives have led to significant advances in Iroquoian archaeology, including new insights about how demographic, ecological, and cultural processes intersect at multiple temporal and spatial scales. Internal and external factors accelerated processes of cultural change, particularly during periods of conflict, coalescence, and encroachment. This review considers the historical development of Northern Iroquoian societies from the beginning of the Late Woodland through the colonial era. The dynamism of the settlement landscape is highlighted, together with the fluidity of sociopolitical identities.

Keywords

North America Great Lakes Iroquoian societies Multiscalar approaches Settlement archaeology Communities 

Notes

Acknowledgments

First, I thank Gary Feinman and T. Douglas Price for inviting this review. This manuscript was improved greatly by comments from Jim Bradley, John Hart, Eric Jones, Kurt Jordan, Steve Kowalewski, Rob MacDonald, William Starna, Gary Warrick, Ron Williamson, and two anonymous reviewers. The development of my ideas about the anthropological archaeology of Iroquoian societies has benefitted tremendously from the mentorship of Ron Williamson and Steve Kowalewski. Ron Williamson has been my guide and chief collaborator in Iroquoian archaeology, and I acknowledge his contribution to Iroquoian studies and extend my appreciation to his team at Archaeological Services Inc. All errors, omissions, and flaws are my sole responsibility.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA

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