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Journal of Archaeological Research

, Volume 14, Issue 4, pp 313–344 | Cite as

Craft Production, Exchange, and Political Power in the Pre-Incaic Andes

  • Kevin J. Vaughn
Original Paper

Abstract

This article explores the relationship between craft production, exchange, and power in the pre-Incaic Andes, with a focus on recent archaeological evidence from Chavín, Nasca, Tiwanaku, Wari, and Moche. I argue that craft production and exchange in concert with materialized ideologies played vital roles in the development of political power in the Andes. In later state societies, craft production, exchange, and materialization were critical in maintaining and legitimizing established political power.

Keywords

Craft production Exchange Power Materialization Andes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I thank Gary M. Feinman for the invitation to write this article. The original manuscript was read by John Janusek, Justin Jennings, Patricia McAnany, Dawn Vaughn, and four anonymous reviewers. This final article has benefited immensely from their insightful comments, and I thank them. Finally, Gary M. Feinman and Linde Nicholas provided invaluable comments and editorial support throughout the review process.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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