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Journal of Academic Ethics

, 9:277 | Cite as

The Health Professional Ethics Rubric: Practical Assessment in Ethics Education for Health Professional Schools

  • Nathan Carlin
  • Cathy Rozmus
  • Jeffrey Spike
  • Irmgard Willcockson
  • William SeifertJr
  • Cynthia Chappell
  • Pei-Hsuan Hsieh
  • Thomas Cole
  • Catherine Flaitz
  • Joan Engebretson
  • Rebecca Lunstroth
  • Charles AmosJr
  • Bryant Boutwell
Article

Abstract

A barrier to the development and refinement of ethics education in and across health professional schools is that there is not an agreed upon instrument or method for assessment in ethics education. The most widely used ethics education assessment instrument is the Defining Issues Test (DIT) I & II. This instrument is not specific to the health professions. But it has been modified for use in, and influenced the development of other instruments in, the health professions. The DIT contains certain philosophical assumptions (“Kohlbergian” or “neo-Kohlbergian”) that have been criticized in recent years. It is also expensive for large institutions to use. The purpose of this article is to offer a rubric—which the authors have named the Health Professional Ethics Rubric—for the assessment of several learning outcomes related to ethics education in health science centers. This rubric is not open to the same philosophical critiques as the DIT and other such instruments. This rubric is also practical to use. This article includes the rubric being advocated, which was developed by faculty and administrators at a large academic health science center as a part of a campus-wide ethics education initiative. The process of developing the rubric is described, as well as certain limitations and plans for revision.

Keywords

Ethics Ethics Education Assessment Rubric Interprofessional Health Professional 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The Health Professional Ethics Rubric (Table 2) was developed in 2009 as a part of the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) for The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The rubric is reprinted here with the permission of The McGovern Center for Humanities and Ethics. The McGovern Center administers the QEP. Information about the QEP, as well as the plan itself, can be found here: http://www.uth.tmc.edu/hhhs/programs/qep/index.html.

The authors wish to express gratitude to the Campus-Wide Ethics Program faculty at UTHealth and to the Quality Enhancement Plan Advisory Team for their assistance in developing this rubric. The authors also wish to express gratitude to Jayne McWherter and to Muhammad Walji for incorporating the rubric into their courses at the School of Dentistry at UTHealth, and to Cheryl Erwin for incorporating the rubric into the Ethical Dimensions of Biomedical Research course. And, finally, the authors would like to thank Angela Polczynski for help in collecting and managing data for this article, as well as for help in preparing the manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nathan Carlin
    • 1
  • Cathy Rozmus
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Spike
    • 3
  • Irmgard Willcockson
    • 4
  • William SeifertJr
    • 5
  • Cynthia Chappell
    • 6
  • Pei-Hsuan Hsieh
    • 7
  • Thomas Cole
    • 3
  • Catherine Flaitz
    • 8
  • Joan Engebretson
    • 2
  • Rebecca Lunstroth
    • 7
  • Charles AmosJr
    • 9
  • Bryant Boutwell
    • 3
  1. 1.Assistant Professor of Medical Humanities, McGovern Center for Humanities and EthicsUniversity of Texas Medical School at HoustonHoustonUSA
  2. 2.School of NursingUTHealthHoustonUSA
  3. 3.McGovern Center for Humanities and EthicsUTHealthHoustonUSA
  4. 4.School of Biomedical InformaticsUTHealthHoustonUSA
  5. 5.The Graduate School of Biomedical SciencesUTHealthHoustonUSA
  6. 6.School of Public HealthUTHealthHoustonUSA
  7. 7.Medical SchoolUTHealthHoustonUSA
  8. 8.School of DentistryUTHealthHoustonUSA
  9. 9.Office of Institutional Quality AssuranceUTHealthHoustonUSA

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