Depression, Anxiety, and Hyperactivity in Youth with HFASD: A Replication and Extension of Symptom Level Differences in Self-Report Versus Parent Report

Abstract

The present study compared parent ratings to self-report ratings of depression, anxiety, hyperactivity, attention problems, and atypical behaviors in youth with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (HFASD) and typically developing (TD) controls. Measures included parent and self-report forms from the Behavioral Assessment System for Children-Second Edition (BASC-2), and self-report forms from the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI) and the Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). Results across all five BASC-2 scales indicated parent ratings for the HFASD condition were significantly higher than HFASD self-ratings, and were significantly higher than parent and self-ratings from the TD condition. In addition, average self-report scores did not differ significantly between HFASD and TD conditions on any of the BASC-2 scales, the CDI, or the MASC.

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Authors

Contributions

JMT conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination, statistical analyses, and drafted the manuscript; MAV conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination, statistical analyses, and drafted the manuscript; KMR participated in the design and coordination of the study, and helped to draft and revise the manuscript; JDR participated in design and coordination of the study, supervised data collection and management, and contributed to interpretation of the data; MLT participated in design and coordination of the study, contributed to data acquisition, and contributed to manuscript preparation and revision; CL participated in design and coordination of the study, contributed to data acquisition, and contributed to manuscript preparation and revision; SYC participated in the design, participant recruitment, statistical analysis, and interpretation of the data; JAT participated in the design, matching, interpretation of the data, and manuscript revision; and AS participated in the design, matching, interpretation of the data, and manuscript revision. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to Janelle M. Taylor.

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All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Informed parent consent was obtained from all parents and child assent was obtained from all child participants included in the study.

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Taylor, J.M., Volker, M.A., Rispoli, K.M. et al. Depression, Anxiety, and Hyperactivity in Youth with HFASD: A Replication and Extension of Symptom Level Differences in Self-Report Versus Parent Report. J Autism Dev Disord 50, 2424–2438 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3779-3

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Keywords

  • Self-report
  • Parent report
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • High-functioning autism
  • Internalizing
  • Externalizing