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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 685–690 | Cite as

Brief Report: Translation and Adaptation of the Theory of Mind Inventory to Spanish

  • Elena Pujals
  • Santiago Batlle
  • Ester Camprodon
  • Sílvia Pujals
  • Xavier Estrada
  • Marta Aceña
  • Araitz Petrizan
  • Lurdes Duñó
  • Josep Martí
  • Luis Miguel Martin
  • Víctor Pérez-Solá
Brief Report

Abstract

The Theory of Mind Inventory is an informant measure designed to evaluate children’s theory of mind competence. We describe the translation and cultural adaptation of the inventory by the following process: (1) translation from English to Spanish by two independent certified translators; (2) production of an agreed version by a multidisciplinary committee of experts; (3) back-translation to English of the agreed version by an independent translator; (4) discussion of the semantic, idiomatic, and cultural equivalence of the final version; (5) elaboration of the final test; (6) pilot test on 24 representatives of the autism spectrum disorders population and 24 representatives of typically developing children. The steps were conducted satisfactorily, producing the final version in Spanish, which showed good psychometric properties.

Keywords

Theory of mind Social cognition Autism spectrum disorder Assessment Adaptation Translation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would especially like to thank the participant families for their valuable collaboration, the valuable time they spent completing the questionnaires, without which the present study of adaptation and validation would not have been possible.

Author contribution

EP conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination and drafted the manuscript; XE, MA and LD participated in the design and interpretation of the data; SP, AP, JM, LMM and VP participated in the design and coordination of the study and performed the measurement; EC participated in the design of the study and performed the statistical analysis; SB conceived of the study, and participated in its design and coordination and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elena Pujals
    • 1
    • 2
  • Santiago Batlle
    • 1
  • Ester Camprodon
    • 1
  • Sílvia Pujals
    • 1
  • Xavier Estrada
    • 1
  • Marta Aceña
    • 1
  • Araitz Petrizan
    • 1
  • Lurdes Duñó
    • 1
  • Josep Martí
    • 1
  • Luis Miguel Martin
    • 1
  • Víctor Pérez-Solá
    • 1
  1. 1.Neuropsychiatry and Drug Addiction InstituteParc de Salut MarBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Forensic MedicineUniversitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)BellaterraSpain

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