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Different Verbal Learning Strategies in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence from the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test

  • Dermot M. Bowler
  • Elyse Limoges
  • Laurent Mottron
Original Paper

Abstract

The Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test, which requires the free recall of the same list of 15 unrelated words over 5 trials, was administered to 21 high-functioning adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 21 matched typical individuals. The groups showed similar overall levels of free recall, rates of learning over trials and subjective organisation of their recall. However, the primacy portion of the serial position curve of the ASD participants showed slower growth over trials than that of the typical participants. The implications of this finding for our understanding of memory in ASD are discussed.

Keywords

High-functioning ASD Verbal learning Free recall Serial position effects Memory 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to thank the participants for giving their time in these experiments. Thanks are also due to the Wellcome Trust, the Medical Research Council (UK), and Canadian Institute of Health Research who financially supported the authors.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dermot M. Bowler
    • 1
  • Elyse Limoges
    • 2
  • Laurent Mottron
    • 2
  1. 1.Autism Research Group, Department of PsychologyCity UniversityLondonUK
  2. 2.Elyse Limoges and Laurent Mottron, Clinique spécialisée des TED, Hôpital Rivière des PrairiesMontrealCanada

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