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High Rates of Psychiatric Co-Morbidity in PDD-NOS

  • Esther I. de Bruin
  • Robert F. Ferdinand
  • Sjifra Meester
  • Pieter F. A. de Nijs
  • Fop Verheij
Original Paper

Abstract

Rates of co-morbid psychiatric conditions in children with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS) are hardly available, although these conditions are often considered as more responsive to treatment than the core symptoms of PDD-NOS. Ninety-four children with PDD-NOS, aged 6–12 years were included. The DISC-IV-P was administered. At least one co-morbid psychiatric disorder was present in 80.9% of the children; 61.7% had a co-morbid disruptive behavior disorder, and 55.3% fulfilled criteria of an anxiety disorder. Compared to those without co-morbid psychiatric disorders, children with a co-morbid disorder had more deficits in social communication. Co-morbid disorders occur very frequently in children with PDD-NOS, and therefore clinical assessment in those children should include assessment of co-morbid DSM-IV disorders.

Keywords

PDD-NOS Autistic disorder Psychiatric co-morbidity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported financially by a grant from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO/ZonMw/OOG-100-002-006). The authors would like to thank Michiel van der Hout, Carlien Bos, and Sieds Dieleman for their valuable contribution to the data collection. A version of this paper will be presented at the World Autism Congress, held in Cape Town, South Africa, November 2006.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Esther I. de Bruin
    • 1
  • Robert F. Ferdinand
    • 1
  • Sjifra Meester
    • 1
  • Pieter F. A. de Nijs
    • 1
  • Fop Verheij
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child and Adolescent PsychiatryErasmus Medical Center Rotterdam/Sophia Children’s HospitalRotterdamThe Netherlands

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