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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 42, Issue 1, pp 7–19 | Cite as

Validity of the Sluggish Cognitive Tempo Symptom Dimension in Children: Sluggish Cognitive Tempo and ADHD-Inattention as Distinct Symptom Dimensions

  • SoYean Lee
  • G. Leonard Burns
  • Jerry Snell
  • Keith McBurnett
Article

Abstract

This study examined the validity of the sluggish cognitive tempo (SCT) symptom dimension in children. Ten symptom domains were used to define SCT (i.e., (1) daydreams; (2) attention fluctuates; (3) absent-minded; (4) loses train of thought; (5) easily confused; (6) seems drowsy; (7) thinking is slow; (8) slow-moving; (9) low initiative; and (10) easily bored, needs stimulation). Teacher ratings of 366 children (ages 5 to 13 with 56 % girls) along with parent ratings of 703 children (ages 5 to 13 with 55 % girls) indicated that SCT symptom domains one to eight showed convergent validity (i.e., substantial loadings on the SCT factor) and discriminant validity with the ADHD-IN dimension (i.e., higher loadings on the SCT factor than the ADHD-IN factor). Higher scores on this eight-symptom measure of SCT predicted lower levels of academic and social competence even after controlling for ADHD-IN and ADHD-HI. In addition, higher SCT scores still predicted higher anxiety/depression scores after controlling for ADHD-IN and ADHD-HI. Higher SCT scores also predicted lower ADHD-HI scores after controlling for ADHD-IN and anxiety/depression while higher ADHD-IN and anxiety/depression scores predicted higher ADHD-HI scores after controlling for SCT and anxiety/depression or ADHD-IN. SCT also showed a unique negative relationship with ODD while ADHD-IN and anxiety/depression showed unique positive relationships with ODD. This new measure of the SCT dimension was meaningfully independent from the ADHD-IN and anxiety/depression dimensions and suggests that such an SCT dimension may signify a distinct presentation of ADHD or a different (if highly comorbid) disorder altogether.

Keywords

Sluggish cognitive tempo Attention deficit disorder Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • SoYean Lee
    • 1
  • G. Leonard Burns
    • 1
  • Jerry Snell
    • 2
  • Keith McBurnett
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyWashington State UniversityPullmanUSA
  2. 2.Clarkston School DistrictClarkstonUSA
  3. 3.University of California at San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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