Exploring entrepreneurial intention among engineering students in India: a multiple basket approach

Abstract

In the light of Bandura’s (Social foundations of thought and action: a social cognitive perspective, Princeton-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, 1986) social cognitive theory (SCT), we investigated the roles of four different entrepreneurial factors: entrepreneurial qualities (EQ), entrepreneurial knowledge (EK), perceived entrepreneurialism (PE) and entrepreneurial inspiration (EIN), in entrepreneurial intention (EI) formation. Alongside, this paper explored the unique role played by entrepreneurial self-efficacy as a mediator among the list of determinants and EI. The study approached with a sample of 1062 final year engineering student from 15 premier technical institutes in India. The findings show that the effects of EQ, PE, and EIN on EI are partially mediated by entrepreneurial self-efficacy whereas a full mediation between EK and EI, which is consistent with the SCT framework. The implications suggest for improving the EK delivery system, which in turn will make students feel self-efficacious toward being entrepreneurial. The article argued on various pedagogical as well as the policy-related context of business venturing at Indian technical institutes.

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This study is not specifically funded by any organization. It’s a part of my research work that will be extended further to attain PhD.

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Roy, R., Das, N. Exploring entrepreneurial intention among engineering students in India: a multiple basket approach. Int J Technol Des Educ (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-020-09596-9

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Keywords

  • Indian engineering students
  • The social-cognitive theory (SCT)
  • Self-efficacy
  • Entrepreneurship
  • Emerging economies