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Intellectual property: what do teachers and students know?

  • Louise Starkey
  • Susan Corbett
  • Ann Bondy
  • Susan Davidson
Article

Abstract

As society changes from an industrial to a knowledge era increasing importance and value is being placed on intellectual property rights. Technology teachers need to have pedagogical content knowledge of intellectual property if they are to incorporate it into their learning programmes to enable students to consider how to respect others’ intellectual property rights, how to protect their own ideas and how they can legitimately make use of others’ intellectual property. A survey of technology teachers and a small sample of students was undertaken to ascertain their knowledge of intellectual property and any misconceptions which may exist. The findings reflect an awareness of relevant concepts but confusion between key terms such as patent, copyright and registered design.

Keywords

Intellectual property Technology education Student rights 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research was carried out in 2007 by Victoria University of Wellington academic staff; Susan Corbett, Ann Bondy and Louise Starkey, as part of a larger research project entitled Intellectual Property in Technology Education: Professional Support Materials. The project was funded by the New Zealand Ministry of Education and is accessible through http://www.techlink.org.nz.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Louise Starkey
    • 1
  • Susan Corbett
    • 1
  • Ann Bondy
    • 1
  • Susan Davidson
    • 1
  1. 1.Victoria University of WellingtonKarori, WellingtonNew Zealand

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