Journal of Indian Philosophy

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 373–398 | Cite as

Traces of Yogācāra in the Chapter on Reality (artha) Within a Work on the Paths and Stages by Gling-ras-pa Padma rdo-rje (1128–1188)

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Abstract

This article aims to introduce some features of the literary output of Gling-ras-pa Padma rdo-rje, who was the teacher of the ‘Brug-pa bKa’-brgyud-pa school’s founder, gTsan-pa rGya-ras Ye-shes rdo-rje (1161–1211) in Tibet. The work that I draw upon here is titled A Torch of Crucial Points. A Condensation and Presentation of all Dharmas that are to be Practiced (gCes pa bsdus pa’i sgron ma ‘am| bslabs par bya ba’i chos thams cad mdor bsdus te bstan pa), a presentation of the entire outline of Buddhist practice that resembles the doctrinal stages (bstan rim) literary genre. Based on an edition and translation of the fifth chapter of the 17 that comprise the work, here I focus on several concepts, such as the three natures (trisvabhāva) and the allground consciousness (ālayavijñāna), that pertain to the system of Yogācāra and the terminology related to it. These are shown as they appear in the framework of the work, which is heavily influenced by the tradition of Mahāmudrā and the background of its author’s life as a wandering yogin in the lineage of Mi-la ras-pa (1040–1132).

Keywords

bKa’-brgyud-pa Gling-ras-pa Gradual path Path of vision Buddhist philosophy of mind 

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Notes

Acknowledgements

This article was first presented as a paper at the workshop “Yogācāra Buddhism in Context” in Munich, June 19–20, 2015 and represents part of my recently finished dissertation project. I would like to express my gratitude to Prof. Franz-Karl Ehrhard for his support throughout my academic studies and during this research in particular. Furthermore I am indebted to Prof. Lambert Schmithausen, Prof. Jowita Kramer, Prof. Klaus-Dieter Mathes, and Dr. Karl Brunnhölzl for their comments during the workshop.

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© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität MünchenMunchenGermany

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