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Unified analysis of liquefaction and the ground flow phenomenon

  • Tae-Hoon Kim
  • Yong-Seong Kim
Article

Abstract

Loose saturated sand behaves as a solid before liquefaction but as a fluid when the excess pore water pressure equals the initial confining stress, after which it recovers its strength. A simple constitutive equation for loose saturated sand was developed to express the phase transformation between a solid and fluid during liquefaction and the ground flow phenomenon. This constitutive equation was used for a shaking table test, and its applicability was investigated by comparing numerical and experimental results

Keywords

liquefaction shaking table test elastoplastic constitutive equation Newtonian viscous fluid constitutive equation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tae-Hoon Kim
    • 1
  • Yong-Seong Kim
    • 1
  1. 1.National Emergency Management AgencySeoulKorea

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