Enacted mind, enminded and encultured action in vocational counseling: contextual action theory

Abstract

Vocational counseling is rooted in a dualistic Cartesian conception of life: the separation of mind and body. In contrast, neuropsychology and cognitive psychology provide a non-Cartesian approach, emphasizing the notion of enacted mind. Recent developments in vocational psychology, such as the constructionist and relational approaches, systems theory, and calls for agency, integrate such thinking. For example, contextual action theory offers a comprehensive approach to enacted mind and enminded and encultured action. Additionally, empirical research and counseling practice offer tools not only to fulfill the criteria required by a non-Cartesian approach but bring career counseling practice closer to human experience.

Résumé

L'esprit en action, l'action en-esprit et en-culture dans le counseling de carrière. Le counseling de carrière est ancré dans une conception cartésienne dualiste de la vie: la séparation de l'esprit et du corps. En revanche, la neuropsychologie et la psychologie cognitive proposent une approche non cartésienne, emphatisant la notion d'esprit en action. Les développements récents dans le domaine du counseling de carrière, tels que les approches constructionnistes et relationnelles, la théorie des systèmes et les appels à l'action, intègrent une telle réflexion. Par exemple, la théorie de l'action contextuelle offre une approche globale de l'esprit en action ainsi que de l'action en-esprit et en-culture. En outre, la recherche empirique et la pratique du conseil offrent des outils non seulement pour remplir les critères requis par une approche non cartésienne, mais aussi pour rapprocher la pratique du conseil de carrière à l'expérience humaine.

Zusammenfassung

Enacted mind, enminded und enkulturiertes Handeln in der Berufsberatung. Die Berufsberatung wurzelt in einer dualistischen kartesianischen Lebensauffassung: der Trennung von Geist und Körper. Im Gegensatz dazu bieten die Neuropsychologie und die kognitive Psychologie einen nicht-kartesianischen Ansatz und betonen den Begriff des “enacted mind” (Anmerkung d. Ü.: der Begriff zielt auf die durch Interaktion mit der Umwelt entwickelte Kognitionen.) Jüngste Entwicklungen in der Berufspsychologie, wie die konstruktivistischen und relationalen Ansätze, die Systemtheorie und die Forderungen nach Handlungsfähigkeit, integrieren ein solches Denken. Beispielsweise bietet die kontextuelle Handlungstheorie einen umfassenden Ansatz für „enacted mind“ und „enminded“ and enkulturiertes Handeln. Darüber hinaus bieten die empirische Forschung und die Beratungspraxis Instrumente, die nicht nur die Kriterien eines nicht-kartesianischen Ansatzes erfüllen, sondern die Praxis der Berufsberatung näher an die menschliche Erfahrung heranführen.

Resumen

Mente en acción, la acción centrada en la mente y la cultura en el asesoramiento vocacional. La orientación vocacional se basa en una concepción Cartesiana dualista de la vida: la separación de la mente y el cuerpo. Por el contrario, la neuropsicología y la psicología cognitiva proporcionan un enfoque no-Cartesiano, enfatizando la noción de la mente en acción. Los desarrollos recientes en psicología vocacional, como los enfoques construccionistas y relacionales, la teoría de sistemas y los que promueven la importancia de la agencia, integran ese pensamiento. Por ejemplo, la teoría de la acción contextual ofrece una aproximación integral de la mente en acción y la acción desde la mente y la cultura. Además, la investigación empírica y la práctica de asesoramiento ofrecen herramientas no sólo para cumplir con los criterios requeridos por un enfoque no-Cartesiano, sino también para acercar la práctica de asesoramiento profesional a las experiencias humanas.

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Valach, L. Enacted mind, enminded and encultured action in vocational counseling: contextual action theory. Int J Educ Vocat Guidance (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10775-020-09432-5

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Keywords

  • Enacted
  • Enminded
  • Encultured
  • Action
  • Career development