Behavior of Sandstones Under Heat Treatment

  • M. Keppert
  • J. Fořt
  • A. Trník
  • D. Koňáková
  • E. Vejmelková
  • J. Pokorný
  • P. Svora
  • Z. Pavlík
  • R. Černý
TEMPMEKO 2016
  • 156 Downloads
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. TEMPMEKO 2016: Selected Papers of the 12th International Symposium on Temperature, Humidity, Moisture and Thermal Measurements in Industry and Science

Abstract

Knowledge of materials behavior under heat treatment is of high importance in construction and safety engineering; tunnels represent a special field because of their specific safety issues. In the case of fire, tunnel structure and surrounding rock are subjected to extreme temperatures which induces irreversible changes in the material’s microstructure and consequently its mechanical properties. Significant portion of the Earth’s crust is formed by sandstones; this group of sedimentary rocks is highly variable in structure, composition and engineering properties. Quartz grains (alternatively together with other minerals) form the clastic part of sandstones; the space between clasts is filled by variable amount of cement and matrix which can contain particularly clay minerals, quartz and calcite. The porosity of sandstones is again highly variable from a nearly compact material to a highly porous one. The paper aims to find out and explain differences in response of various kinds of sandstones to heat treatment. The behavior of a representative set of sandstones under heat treatment was studied by TG/DSC, thermodilatometry and residual strength measurement. These experiments were accompanied by SEM and porosimetry measurement. The effect of increased temperature on the compressive strength was found to be crucially dependent on the nature of the cement and matrix present in the individual rock. The rocks with calcite cement which had high initial strength and low porosity were damaged by calcite decomposition. The siliceous sandstones were damaged by cracking due to thermally induced volume changes. In contrary, the strength of the clayey sandstones was even improved after the heat treatment. It can be concluded that behavior of sandstone under heat treatment is controlled by its composition and diagenesis.

Keywords

Compressive strength Heat treatment Porosity Sandstone Thermodilatometry Thermogravimetry 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research has been supported by the Czech Science Foundation under Project No. 14-17207S “Transport parameters and durability of porous rocks.”

References

  1. 1.
    M.C. Weng, F.S. Jeng, T.H. Huang, M.L. Lin, Int. J. Rock Mech. Min. Sci. 42, 388 (2005)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. Hidaka, K. Horie, F. Gauthier-Lafaye, Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 264, 167 (2007)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. Baz, M. Noureldin, W.G. Allinson, Y. Cinar, Int. J. Greenh. Gas Control 46, 86 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. Dillinger, L.P. Ricard, C. Huddlestone-Holmes, L. Esteban, Basin Res. 28, 252 (2016)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    L.Y. Zhang, X.B. Mao, A.H. Lu, Sci. China Ser. E Technol. Sci. 52, 641 (2009)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    C. Saiang, K. Miskovsky, in Harmonising Rock Engineering and Environment, ed. by Q. Qian, Y. Zhou (CRC Press, 2012)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    P.G. Ranjith, D.R. Viete, B.J. Chen, M.S.A. Perera, Eng. Geol. 151, 120 (2012)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    E. Plevova, L. Vaculikova, A. Kozusnikova, T. Danek, M. Pleva, M. Ritz, G. Simha Martynková, J. Therm. Anal. Calorim. 103, 853 (2011)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Hajpal, Fire Technol. 38, 373 (2002)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    M. Hajpal, A. Torok, Environ. Geol. 46, 311 (2004)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    L.L. Nguyep Mambou, J. Ndop, J.M.B. Ndjaka, J. Min. Sci 50, 69 (2014)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    P.R.L. Welche, V. Heine, M.T. Dove, Phys. Chem. Miner. 26, 63 (1998)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    D.T. Beruto, R. Botter, R. Cabella, A. Lagazzo, J. Eur. Ceram. Soc. 30, 1277 (2010)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    C. Chang, M.D. Zoback, A. Khaksar, J. Petrol. Sci. Eng. 51, 223 (2006)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. Ondruska, A. Trnik, M. Keppert, I. Medved, L. Vozar, Int. J. Thermophys. 35, 1946 (2014)ADSCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    I. Stubna, P. Sin, A. Trnik, R. Veinthal, Key Eng. Mater. 527, 14 (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    I. Stubna, P. Sin, A. Trnik, L. Vozar, Meas. Sci. Rev. 14, 35 (2014)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Keppert
    • 1
  • J. Fořt
    • 1
  • A. Trník
    • 1
  • D. Koňáková
    • 1
  • E. Vejmelková
    • 1
  • J. Pokorný
    • 1
  • P. Svora
    • 1
  • Z. Pavlík
    • 1
  • R. Černý
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Materials Engineering and Chemistry, Faculty of Civil EngineeringCzech Technical University in PraguePraha 6Czech Republic

Personalised recommendations