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International Journal of Thermophysics

, Volume 34, Issue 8–9, pp 1444–1450 | Cite as

Photoacoustic Detection of Perfluorocarbon Tracers in Air for Application to Leak Detection in Oil-Filled Cables

  • N. Zajarevich
  • V. Slezak
  • A. Peuriot
  • G. Villa
  • A. Láttero
  • R. Crivicich
Article

Abstract

The underground oil-filled cable consists of a hollow copper conductor surrounded by oiled paper which acts as electrical insulation. The oil flows along the conductor and diffuses through it to the insulating paper. A lead sheath is used as the outer retaining wall. As the deterioration of this cover may cause a loss of insulation fluid, its detection is very important since this high voltage and power cable is used in cities even under sidewalks. The method of perfluorocarbon vapor tracers, based on the injection and subsequent detection of these volatile chemical substances in the vicinity of the cable, is one of the most promising methods, so far used in combination with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. In this study, the possibility of detecting two different tracers, \(\mathrm{C}_{6}\mathrm{F}_{12}\) and \(\mathrm{C}_{7}\mathrm{F}_{14}\), by means of resonant photoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. The beam from a tunable amplitude-modulated \(\mathrm{CO}_{2}\) laser goes through an aluminum cell with quarter wave filters at both ends of an open resonator and an electret microphone in its center, attached to the walls. The calibration of the system for either substance diluted in chromatographic air showed a higher sensitivity for \(\mathrm{C}_{7}\mathrm{F}_{14}\), so the experiment was completed checking the behavior of this substance in samples prepared with ambient air in order to analyze the application of the system to field studies.

Keywords

Oil-filled cable Perfluorocarbon Photoacoustic  Tracer 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the company of electricity of Argentina, EDENOR, and CITEDEF.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • N. Zajarevich
    • 1
  • V. Slezak
    • 1
  • A. Peuriot
    • 1
  • G. Villa
    • 2
  • A. Láttero
    • 2
  • R. Crivicich
    • 2
  1. 1.CEILAP-UNIDEF-CITEDEFBuenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Facultad Regional General Pacheco, Universidad Tecnológica Nacional (UTN)Buenos AiresArgentina

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