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International Journal of Thermophysics

, Volume 27, Issue 1, pp 270–281 | Cite as

Specific Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductivity of Foam Glass (Type 150P) at Temperatures from 80 to 400 K1

  • Dan-Ting Yue
  • Zhi-Cheng Tan
  • You-Ying Di
  • Xin-Rong Lv
  • Li-Xian Sun
Article

Low-temperature specific heat capacities of foam glass (Type 150P) have been measured from 79 to 395 K by a precision automated adiabatic calorimeter. Thermal conductivities of the glass foams have been determined from 243 to 395 K with a flat steady-state heat-flow meter. Experimental results have shown that both the specific heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the 150P foam glass increased with temperature. Experimentally measured specific heat capacities have been fitted by a polynomial equation from 79 to 395 K: C p /J · g−1· K−1=0.6889+0.3332x− 0.0578x 2+0.0987x 3+0.0521x 4− 0.0330x 5− 0.0629x 6, where x=(T/K − 273)/158. Experimental thermal conductivities as a function of temperature (T) have been fitted by another polynomial equation from 243 to 395 K: λ/ W · m−1· K−1=0.14433+0.00129T − 2.834 × 10−6 T 2+2.18 × 10−9 T 3. In addition, thermal diffusivities (a) of the form glass sample were calculated from the specific heat capacities and thermal conductivities and have been fitted by a polynomial equation as a function of temperature (T): a/m2 · s−1=−1.68285+0.01833T − 5.84891 × 10−5 T 2+8.11942 × 10−8 T 3 − 4.24975 × 10−11 T 4.

Keywords

enthalpy and entropy functions foam glass low-temperature specific heat capacity thermal conductivity thermal diffusivity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dan-Ting Yue
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zhi-Cheng Tan
    • 1
  • You-Ying Di
    • 1
  • Xin-Rong Lv
    • 2
  • Li-Xian Sun
    • 1
  1. 1.Thermochemistry Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical PhysicsChinese Academy of SciencesDalianP. R. China
  2. 2.Marine Engineering CollegeDalian Maritime UniversityDalianP. R. China

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