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STRATEGIES FOR SOLVING THREE FRACTION-RELATED WORD PROBLEMS ON SPEED: A COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN CHINESE AND SINGAPOREAN STUDENTS

  • Chunlian Jiang
  • Boon Liang Chua
Article

Abstract

This paper presents the results obtained from a study comparing the strategies used by 1,070 Chinese students and 1,002 Singaporean students from primary grade 6 to secondary year 2 in solving three fraction-related problems. It is part of the author's Ph.D. study, which involves more word problems on speed. The Chinese students performed better than the Singaporean students on two of the three problems, while the Singaporean students performed better than the Chinese students on the other. The strategy analyses reveal that the Chinese students used the traditional methods like arithmetic and algebraic strategies more frequently than the Singaporean students, whereas the Singaporean students used the model and unitary methods more frequently than the Chinese students. Implications for the teaching and learning of word problems on speed, as well as problem solving, are also provided.

Key words

cross-national comparison problem-solving strategies speed word problems 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of MacauMacauChina
  2. 2.Department of Mathematics & StatisticsCentral China Normal UniversityWuhan CityChina
  3. 3.Mathematics & Mathematics Education Academic GroupNational Institute of Education, Nanyang Technological University1 Nanyang WalkSingapore

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