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Using Guide Wavelengths to Assess Far-Infrared Laser Emissions

  • B. DeShano
  • K. Olivier
  • B. Cain
  • L. R. Zink
  • M. Jackson
Article

Abstract

An optically pumped molecular laser system with a transverse excitation scheme has been used to observe 77 guide wavelengths associated with the modes of an oversized waveguide laser resonator. These guide wavelengths, spanning from 102.6 to 990.6 μm, were generated by a variety of lasing media, including methanol along with several symmetric- and asymmetric-top molecules. The guide wavelengths displayed several consistent characteristics when compared with their respective fundamental laser emissions: their wavelengths were about 0.47 % larger and their relative powers were at least a factor of ten weaker. The properties of these guide wavelengths were used to assess frequency and wavelength measurements associated with known far-infrared laser emissions. For several of these laser emissions, this prompted a reinvestigation and subsequent revision of their measured values. Five far-infrared laser frequencies were also measured for the first time.

Keywords

Optically pumped molecular laser Guide wavelengths 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation (Award No. 0910935), the Washington Space Grant Consortium (Award No. NNX10AK64H), and Central Washington University (Sabbatical Leave and Science Honors Research Programs). We are pleased to acknowledge E. Johnson, S. Ifland, M. McKnight, N. Palmquist, P. Penoyar, and M. Pruett for their assistance in measuring the guide wavelengths for a number of the far-infrared laser emissions. We would also like to thank M. Braunstein, T. Goyette, I. Falconer, B. James, P. Krug, P. Nachman, and L. Whitbourn for their fruitful discussions.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. DeShano
    • 1
  • K. Olivier
    • 1
  • B. Cain
    • 2
  • L. R. Zink
    • 3
  • M. Jackson
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysicsCentral Washington UniversityEllensburgUSA
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsEdmonds Community CollegeLynnwoodUSA
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsUniversity of Wisconsin-La CrosseLa CrosseUSA

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