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Middle-Class Ideologies and American Respectability: Archaeology and the Irish Immigrant Experience

  • Stephen A. Brighton
Article

Abstract

This study illustrates the materialization of identity shifts through refined ceramic and glass forms recovered from working class Irish immigrant and Irish-American communities. The sites used in this article were chosen because of their spatio-temporal compatibility covering dynamic periods of Irish identity in the United States. Historians argue that 1880 marks the beginning of an identity shift from Irish immigrant to Irish-American. This research attempts to provide the necessary materials to begin a discourse bringing together material and historical evidence illuminating the conflict between competing ideologies of respectability and changing conceptions of Irish identity in America.

Keywords

Irish identity Material culture Ideology Class conflict 

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA

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