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Boundaries, Borders, and Reference Points: The Caribbean Defined as Geographic Region and Social Reality

  • Marco Meniketti
Article

Abstract

Terms used to describe a region often reflect and directly influence the way space, identity, and history are conceived or constructed. The Caribbean is one such place where external definitions frequently transcend simple geography and socio-political boundaries. The region can be understood by both temporal and cultural categories. The case is made in this paper that archaeological interpretations of social history are impacted by how one conceives of the region.

Keywords

Caribbean Colonialism Historical geography World systems 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologySan Jose State UniversitySan JoseUSA

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