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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 338–359 | Cite as

From Grand Dérangement to Acadiana: History and Identity in the Landscape of South Louisiana

  • Mark A. Rees
Article
  • 348 Downloads

Abstract

Acadian expulsion from Nova Scotia and subsequent settlement in south Louisiana during the late eighteenth century have inspired numerous studies since the 1970s concerning their history, cultural practices, and ethnic identity. The transformative landscape of south Louisiana is the milieu where actions, experiences, and perception interconnect with collective memory and historical consciousness in the production of Cajun identity. The resulting historical narratives and commemorations constitute a heritage landscape known as Acadiana, where monuments, memorials, historic sites, and parks reaffirm and reproduce this identity. An historical archaeology of Acadiana, including a recent investigation of the Amand Broussard homesite, offers a unique opportunity for cultural analysis and historical critique.

Keywords

Acadian Cajun Landscape Commemoration Heritage 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author is grateful for the efforts of the guest editor, Elizabeth Scott, for instigating and assembling this volume, as well as her patience and willingness to extend already overextended deadlines. Jacques Henry read a draft of this paper and offered helpful suggestions. C. Ray Brassieur shared insights and knowledge of Acadiana. Sarah Rees clarified certain French translations. Gregory Waselkov and an anonymous reviewer provided challenging comments, some of which prompted further revision. The author is indebted to numerous scholars, many of whom are cited herein, for their ideas and innovative research on le Grand Dérangement and the history of Acadiana. The perspective offered here is somewhat peculiar to the author, who is of course responsible for any errors. This article is dedicated to the memory of Grover J. Rees.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyUniversity of Louisiana at LafayetteLafayetteUSA

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