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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 12, Issue 3, pp 181–194 | Cite as

Historical Archaeology as Modern-World Archaeology in Argentina

  • Charles E. OrserJr.
Article

Abstract

Historical archaeology has grown at a remarkable pace in the last decade. South America has seen a major growth in historical archaeology, with archaeologists in Argentina playing a large role in the maturation of the discipline on the continent. Much of this archaeology can be characterized as “modern-world archaeology” because of the archaeologists’ interest in issues relevant to post-Columbian cultural history.

Keywords

Modern-world archaeology Argentina 

Notes

Acknowledgments

I wish to acknowledge my debt of gratitude to Pedro Paulo A. Funari and Facundo Gómez Romero for the many discussions I have had with both of them. They have helped me understand the nature and promise of historical archaeology in South America. Though I have learned a great deal from both of them, the comments expressed here are entirely my own.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research and Collections DivisionNew York State MuseumAlbanyUSA

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