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The Wreck of the Ex-Slaver James Matthews

  • Graeme Henderson
Article

Abstract

This contribution presents the progress of investigations into the wreck of the ex-slave ship James Matthews, wrecked off Western Australia in 1841. The James Matthews wreck site preserves many elements of the vessel’s structure, with the result that the basic architecture of an actual transport vehicle of the Middle Passage has been recorded in detail and can be analyzed in depth by maritime archaeologists working in tandem with naval architects. The discovery of the James Matthews wreck has made possible cross-disciplinary research of a type not previously feasible for the illegal period of slavery in the Atlantic.

Keywords

Slavers Wrecks Australia 

Notes

Acknowledgments

My thanks to Ms. Patricia Layzell Ward, Wales, M. Charles Bouvier, Neuilly Sur Seine and Cdt. Alain Demerliac, Le Havre for information on the French Ambassador’s correspondence, and to Mr. Luc van Coolput and Dr. Marnix Pieters of the Maritime Archaeology and Heritage Afloat unit of the Flemish Heritage Institute (VIOE) for information on the 140 ton Belgian brig Voltigeur.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Western Australia Maritime MuseumFremantleAustralia

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