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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 291–318 | Cite as

The Archaeology of Slavery at the Van Cortlandt Plantation in the Bronx, New York

  • H. Arthur Bankoff
  • Frederick A. Winter
Article

Abstract

Excavations at the Van Cortlandt Mansion, the central structure of an eighteenth-century plantation located in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx, New York, highlight the difficulty of using archaeological evidence to document the story of enslavement in early America. While the documents indicate the extent of the Van Cortlandts' involvement in the slave trade and in the reliance on enslaved labor to build and run their enterprise, the excavations carried out over several years have not yielded concomitant evidence.

Keywords

plantations slavery documentary history New York 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology and ArchaeologyBrooklyn College of the City University of New YorkBrooklyn
  2. 2.Arlington

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