Analysis of Network Classroom Environment on the Learning Ability of College Students

Abstract

With the development of science and technology, great changes have taken place in the way of education. To study the influence of network classroom environment on the learning ability of university students, one hundred and fifty students from the same major were taken as the experimental subjects, and they learned in the traditional classroom environment and the rain classroom based network classroom environment respectively. Then the academic performance and questionnaire survey of the two classes was analyzed. The results showed that the average score of the final exam was 77.2 points and 83.2 points respectively in the traditional classroom environment and online classroom environment. In the network classroom environment, the students had higher performance, the number of students who gained high score was larger, and their ability of information processing, autonomous learning and collaborative learning improved. The experimental results show that the network classroom environment has a positive effect on learning ability, which makes some contributions to the promotion of network classroom in colleges and universities, is beneficial to promote the diversification of learning means of students, and provides some new ideas for improving the learning ability of university students.

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Correspondence to Hui Gao.

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Gao, H. Analysis of Network Classroom Environment on the Learning Ability of College Students. Tech Know Learn 26, 1–12 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10758-020-09457-3

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Keywords

  • Network classroom
  • English teaching
  • Learning ability
  • Test scores
  • Questionnaire survey