Students’ and Parents’ Opinions on the Use of Digital Storytelling in Science Education

Abstract

This paper examines the effects of digital storytelling activities (hereinafter: DST) in Science class on instructional effectiveness and learners’ satisfaction in terms of participants’ perceptions and parents’ opinions. In line with this aim, a mixed research model was designed, and data were collected after a 13-week implementation from learners and parents. Findings indicated that DST implementation made learners have a high level of satisfaction during learning process. Similarly, parents found DST activities as entertaining and appealing and this provided learners with positive changes in their attitudes towards Science instruction. When instructional benefits of DST process are considered, the striking findings obtained from learners and parents’ perceptions can be listed as; DST process contributes to the development of learner engagement and efforts made in this process, to gain new knowledge and technological skills and to contribute to the development of learners in both personal and social terms.

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Saritepeci, M. Students’ and Parents’ Opinions on the Use of Digital Storytelling in Science Education. Tech Know Learn 26, 193–213 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10758-020-09440-y

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Keywords

  • Digital storytelling
  • Parents’ opinions
  • Learner satisfaction
  • Science instruction