Inflammation

, Volume 41, Issue 2, pp 562–568 | Cite as

Sinapic Acid Inhibits the IL-1β-Induced Inflammation via MAPK Downregulation in Rat Chondrocytes

  • Xiaojian Huang
  • Qiyong Pan
  • Zekai Mao
  • Rui Zhang
  • Xiaohu Ma
  • Yang Xi
  • Hongbo You
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease frequently seen in the elderly population. Sinapic acid (SA), a commonly found phenolic acid, has been pharmacologically evaluated for its anti-inflammation effects in various studies. To explore its potential therapeutic role for OA, rat chondrocytes were treated with IL-1β (10 ng/ml) with different concentrations of SA in vitro. Our study revealed that SA could inhibit the IL-1β-induced production of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2). Consistent with these findings, the increased protein levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase (Cox)-2 could also be downregulated by SA. Moreover, SA could also suppress the IL-1β-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1, MMP-3, MMP-13, and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 5 (ADAMTS5) in chondrocytes. Furthermore, our data found that SA could suppress the IL-1β-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway activation. In general, this paper elucidates that sinapic acid inhibits the IL-1β-induced inflammation via MAPK pathways and may be a good agent for the treatment of OA.

KEY WORDS

osteoarthritis iNOS Cox-2 MMPs ADAMTS5 MAPK 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

All animal experiment procedures used in this study complied with the guidelines of the Animal Care and Use Committee of Tongji Medical College, Wuhan, China.

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaojian Huang
    • 1
  • Qiyong Pan
    • 1
  • Zekai Mao
    • 1
  • Rui Zhang
    • 1
  • Xiaohu Ma
    • 1
  • Yang Xi
    • 1
  • Hongbo You
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Orthopedics, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical CollegeHuazhong University of Science and TechnologyWuhanChina

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