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Human Physiology

, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp 525–531 | Cite as

Interhemispheric Asymmetry, Visual Learning and Invariant Identification of Images

  • V. D. Glezer
  • A. A. Nevskaya
  • N. D. Chernova
  • V. E. Gauzel'man
  • A. B. Kravtsov
Article
  • 22 Downloads

Abstract

Using a blockade of the communication between the hemispheres, the rate of learning to recognize figures and the invariance of their identification were studied for both hemispheres. The size and the orientation of figures were changed and a compression of figures was performed during the investigation of the invariance. Visual recognition of both memorized and modified images involved predominantly the right hemisphere in most subjects. A few subjects displayed a prevalence of the left or neither hemisphere. In different subjects, the degree of invariance did not correlate with constant interhemispheric differences. In subjects with a predominance of the right hemisphere, changes of figures substantially affected the identification in the right hemisphere. The opposite result was observed in subjects with a predominance of the left hemisphere. The data are discussed from the viewpoint of double dichotomy of the visual brain. There is reason to suppose an inverted hemispheric location of mechanisms of spatial-frequency analysis and specific description of a visual image in some subjects with the predominance of the left hemisphere.

Keywords

Human Physiology Left Hemisphere Visual Image Opposite Result Visual Recognition 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© MAIK "Nauka/Interperiodica" 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. D. Glezer
    • 1
  • A. A. Nevskaya
    • 1
  • N. D. Chernova
    • 1
  • V. E. Gauzel'man
    • 1
  • A. B. Kravtsov
    • 2
  1. 1.Pavlov Institute of PhysiologyRussian Academy of SciencesSt. PetersburgRussia
  2. 2.St. Petersburg State UniversitySt. PetersburgRussia

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