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Human Ecology

, Volume 33, Issue 1, pp 83–118 | Cite as

Ethnobotanical Study of Edible Wild Plants in Some Selected Districts of Ethiopia

  • Getachew Addis
  • Kelbessa Urga
  • Dawit Dikasso
Article

Abstract

The ethnobotanical study on edible wild plants was carried out from May to December, 2001, in four districts of Ethiopia. The study areas included the rural and semiurban settings of Alamata, Cheha, Goma, and Yilmana Denssa districts of Tigray, Southern Peoples, Oromiya, and Amhara regional states, respectively. Voucher plant specimens were collected along with ethnobotanical information, and scientific names were determined. One hundred and fifty two plant parts from 130 species were recognized and consumed in these districts. Children consumed more wild plants during seasons of food availability (sufficient crop stock) than adults. There was marked increase in quantity and number of wild plant species consumed during food shortage and famine. A few of the reportedly edible species caused health problems that sometimes lead to fatality. Research into the safety and nutritional composition of edible wild plants and fungi is warranted. Selected edible wild plant species should be promoted as supplements to dietary variety and/or bridging the hungry periods of food shortage.

Keywords

drought edible wild plants Ethiopia food shortage poisoning 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Ethiopian HealthNutrition Research InstituteAddis AbabaEthiopia
  2. 2.Ethiopian HealthNutrition Research InstituteAddis AbabaEthiopia

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