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Heart Failure Reviews

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 37–47 | Cite as

Renal dysfunction in heart failure patients: what is the evidence?

  • Heath E. Saltzman
  • Kumar Sharma
  • Paul J. Mather
  • Sharon Rubin
  • Suzanne Adams
  • David Joshua Whellan
Article

Abstract

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is an increasingly common medical condition and the fastest growing cardiovascular diagnosis in North America. Over one-third of patients with heart failure also have renal insufficiency. It has been shown that renal insufficiency confers worsened outcomes to patients with heart failure. However, a majority of the larger and therapy-defining heart failure medication and device trials exclude patients with advanced renal dysfunction. These studies also infrequently perform subgroup analyses based on the degree of renal dysfunction. The lack of information on heart failure patients who have renal insufficiency likely contributes to their being prescribed mortality and morbidity reducing medications and receiving diagnostic and therapeutic procedures at lower rates than heart failure patients with normal renal function. Inclusion of patients with renal insufficiency in heart failure studies and published guidelines for medication, device, and interventional therapies would likely improve patient outcomes.

Keywords

Heart failure Renal dysfunction Worsened outcomes 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Heath E. Saltzman
    • 1
  • Kumar Sharma
    • 2
  • Paul J. Mather
    • 1
  • Sharon Rubin
    • 1
  • Suzanne Adams
    • 1
  • David Joshua Whellan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson Heart InstituteThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Novel Therapies for Kidney Disease, Department of Medicine, Jefferson Medical College, Jefferson Heart InstituteThomas Jefferson UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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