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Journal of Molecular Histology

, Volume 46, Issue 3, pp 313–323 | Cite as

Histochemical evidence of zoledronate inhibiting c-src expression and interfering with CD44/OPN-mediated osteoclast adhesion in the tibiae of mice

  • Hongrui Liu
  • Jian Cui
  • Jing Sun
  • Juan Du
  • Wei Feng
  • Bao Sun
  • Juan Li
  • Xiuchun Han
  • Bo Liu
  • Yimin
  • Kimimitsu Oda
  • Norio Amizuka
  • Minqi Li
Original Paper

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of zoledronate (ZA) on osteoclast functions and viability in the tibiae of 8-week-old male mice. After weekly intravenous administration of ZA (125 μg/kg body weight) for 8 weeks, the mice were fixed by transcardial perfusion of 4 % paraformaldehyde under anesthesia, and their tibiae were extracted for histochemical analysis. Compared with the control group, many tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase-positive osteoclasts were found on the surface of the trabecular bone, but cartilage cores were obviously increased in the metaphysis of the ZA group. Osteoclasts of both groups showed similar expression of cathepsin K and matrix metalloproteinase-9. However, hardly any expression of c-src, a gene necessary for ruffled border formation and bone resorption, was found in osteoclasts of the ZA group. Moreover, no expression of CD44 or osteopontin (OPN) was observed in osteoclasts of the ZA group. Taken together, our findings suggest that ZA administration decreases the bone resorption ability of osteoclasts by inhibiting c-src expression and suppressing osteoclast adhesion by interfering with CD44/OPN binding.

Keywords

Zoledronate Osteoblasts Osteoclasts C-src Adhesion 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was partially supported by the National Nature Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 81271965; 81470719; 81311140173) and Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education (Grant No. 20120131110073) to Li M.

Ethical standard

The animals were maintained and all experimental procedures were approved by the Committee on the Ethics of Animal Experiments of Shandong University. All surgery was performed under chloral hydrate anesthesia, and all efforts were made to minimize suffering.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hongrui Liu
    • 1
  • Jian Cui
    • 1
  • Jing Sun
    • 1
  • Juan Du
    • 1
  • Wei Feng
    • 1
  • Bao Sun
    • 1
  • Juan Li
    • 1
  • Xiuchun Han
    • 1
  • Bo Liu
    • 1
  • Yimin
    • 2
  • Kimimitsu Oda
    • 3
  • Norio Amizuka
    • 4
  • Minqi Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Bone Metabolism, School of Stomatology Shandong UniversityShandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral BiomedicineJinanChina
  2. 2.Department of Advanced Medicine, Graduate School of MedicineHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan
  3. 3.Division of BiochemistryNiigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental SciencesNiigataJapan
  4. 4.Department of Developmental Biology of Hard Tissue, Graduate School of Dental MedicineHokkaido UniversitySapporoJapan

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