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Journal of Molecular Histology

, Volume 44, Issue 5, pp 497–505 | Cite as

Up-regulated expression of Bnip3L after intracerebral hemorrhage in adult rats

  • Ying Rui
  • Kaifu Ke
  • Lei Li
  • Heyi Zheng
  • Wei Xu
  • Xiang Tan
  • Jianhua Cao
  • Xiaoyan Wu
  • Gang Cui
  • Guangwei Zhao
  • Yilu Gao
  • Maohong Cao
Original Paper

Abstract

Bnip3L, also known as NIX, is a homolog of the E1B 19K/Bcl-2 binding and pro-apoptotic protein Bnip3 which can bind to Bcl-2 to elaborate that effect. In tumor cells, Bnip3L played a role in tumor growth inhibition, but some studies argued hypoxia-induced autophagy via Bnip3L was a survival mechanism that promoted tumor progression. In heart muscle, it related to decreased myocardial function. However, its function in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is still not clear. In this frame, we found the Bnip3L expression increased in the perihematomal region in adult rats after performed ICH. Double immunofluorenscence staining manifested that Bnip3L co-located with neurons, not astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. Furthermore, we detected that neuronal apoptosis marker active caspase-3 had colocalizations with Bnip3L. In addition, colocalizations and co-immunoprecipitation between Bnip3L and Bcl-2, consistent with previous study, were also found. All our findings suggested that Bnip3L might be involved in the pathophysiology of ICH.

Keywords

Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) Bnip3L Apoptosis Adult rats 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81070992) and A Project Funded by the Priority Academic Program Development of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions (PAPD).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ying Rui
    • 1
  • Kaifu Ke
    • 1
  • Lei Li
    • 1
  • Heyi Zheng
    • 1
  • Wei Xu
    • 1
  • Xiang Tan
    • 1
  • Jianhua Cao
    • 1
  • Xiaoyan Wu
    • 1
  • Gang Cui
    • 1
  • Guangwei Zhao
    • 1
  • Yilu Gao
    • 1
  • Maohong Cao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurologyAffiliated Hospital of Nantong UniversityNantongPeople’s Republic of China

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