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Journal of Molecular Histology

, Volume 43, Issue 5, pp 535–542 | Cite as

Protective effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide on neonatal rat primary cultured hippocampal neurons injured by oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion

  • Chen Rui
  • Li Yuxiang
  • Hao Yinju
  • Zhu Qingluan
  • Wu Yang
  • Zhao Qipeng
  • Wang Hao
  • Ma Lin
  • Liu Juan
  • Zhao Chengjun
  • Jiang Yuanxu
  • Wang Yanrong
  • Dai Xiuying
  • Zhang Wannian
  • Sun Tao
  • Yu Jianqiang
Original Paper

Abstract

This study investigated the protective effects of Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) on alleviating injury from oxygen-glucose deprivation/reperfusion (OGD/RP) in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Cultured hippocampal neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) for 2 h followed by a 24 h re-oxygenation. The MTT assay and the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release were used to determine the neuron viability. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined by spectrophotometry using commercial kits. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in hippocampal neurons were measured using the confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM). Treatment with LBP (10–40 mg/l) significantly attenuated neuronal damage and inhibited LDH release in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, LBP enhanced activities of SOD and GSH-PX but it decreased their MDA content, inhibited [Ca2+]i elevation and decrease of MMP in ischemia–reperfusion treated hippocampal neurons. These findings suggested that LBP may be a potential neuroprotective agent for cerebral ischemia–reperfusion injury.

Keywords

Lycium barbarum polysaccharide (LBP) Hippocampal neurons Oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion Neuroprotection 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The study was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 30960506, 81160524). We are indebted to the staff in the animal center and the Science &Technology Centre who provided assistance in the study. The authors would like to thank Dr. Ding-Feng Su, Prof. Zhang Wannian, Miss Wang jie, Miss Wang Shujing and Zhang Yan for their contributions to development and implementation of this study.

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chen Rui
    • 1
  • Li Yuxiang
    • 2
  • Hao Yinju
    • 1
  • Zhu Qingluan
    • 1
  • Wu Yang
    • 1
  • Zhao Qipeng
    • 1
  • Wang Hao
    • 3
  • Ma Lin
    • 4
  • Liu Juan
    • 5
  • Zhao Chengjun
    • 5
  • Jiang Yuanxu
    • 1
  • Wang Yanrong
    • 6
  • Dai Xiuying
    • 7
  • Zhang Wannian
    • 8
  • Sun Tao
    • 4
  • Yu Jianqiang
    • 9
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  2. 2.College of NursingNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  3. 3.College of PharmacyNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  4. 4.Ningxia Key Lab of Craniocerbral Diseases of Ningxia Hui Autonomous RegionYinchuanChina
  5. 5.School of Basis Medical ScienceNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  6. 6.Key Laboratory of Fertility Preservation and MaintenanceYinchuanChina
  7. 7.Ningxia Medical UniversityYinchuanChina
  8. 8.Ningxia Hui Medicine Modern Engineering Research CenterYinchuanChina
  9. 9.Medical Sci-tech Research CenterNingxia Medical UniversityYinchuanPeople’s Republic of China

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