Advertisement

Conserved expression of the PRELI domain containing 2 gene (Prelid2) during mid-later-gestation mouse embryogenesis

  • Mengya Gao
  • Qi Liu
  • Fengwei Zhang
  • Zhengbin Han
  • Tiantian Gu
  • Weiming Tian
  • Yan Chen
  • Qiong Wu
Original Paper

Abstract

Prelid2, which belongs to the PRELI domain containing family, is identified as a conserved evolution gene. The expression and regulation during embryonic development of the prelid2 gene is unknown. In this study, we investigated the prelid2 gene expression and regulation using mouse embryos model, by in situ hybridization analysis, RT-PCR and bisulfite sequencing. In situ hybridization analysis showed that prelid2 gene expression were found in midbrain, spinal cord, optic eminence, otic vesicle and tail at E9.5 and E10.5 embryos, in forebrain, hindbrain, heart, lung, liver and kidney at E13.5 and E15.5 embryos. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR results verified the expression pattern in the four major mouse organs, brain, heart, lung, and liver during organs differentiation and formation. Bisulfite sequencing illustrated the consistent result of expression and its unmethylation status in the genomic promoter region at E12.5, E18.5, and new born. Thus, the prelid2 gene is a widely-spread, persistently expressed and unmethylated gene in mouse embryonic development. Our results suggest that the PRELI domain containing 2 gene is involved in mouse embryonic development.

Keywords

prelid2 Embryonic development Unmethylated In situ hybridization Real-time quantitative RT-PCR 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is financially supported by Ministry of Education Scholarship (Grant No. GFEQ24403001), Harbin Institute of Technology Introduction of Scientific Research Talents Activation Fee (Grant No. GFQQ18600015), and Heilongjiang Province Technological Project Program Returning Foundation (Grant No. LC08C05).

References

  1. Anantharaman V, Aravind L (2002) The GOLD domain, a novel protein module involved in Golgi function and secretion. Genome Biol 3: research0023.1-0023.7Google Scholar
  2. Bourc’his D, Proudhon C (2008) Sexual dimorphism in parental imprint ontogeny and contribution to embryonic development. Mol Cell Endocrinol 282:87–94CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. Chomczynski N, Sacchi N (1987) Single-step method of RNA isolation by acid guanidinium thiocyanate-phenol-chloroform extraction. Anal Biochem 162:156–159CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Dee CT, Moffat KG (2005) A novel family of mitochondrial proteins is represented by the Drosophila genes slmo, preli-like and real-time. Dev Genes Evol 215:248–254CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Fox EJ, Stubbs SA, Kyaw TJ, Leek JP, Markham AF, Wright SC (2004) PRELI (protein of relevant evolutionary and lymphoid interest) is located within an evolutionarily conserved gene cluster on chromosome 5q34-q35 and encodes a novel mitochondrial protein. Biochem J 378:817–825CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Guzman-Rojas L, Sims JC, Rangel R, Guret C, Sun Y, Alcocer JM, Martinez-Valdez H (2000) PRELI, the human homologue of the avian px19, is expressed by germinal center B lymphocytes. Int Immunol 12:607–612CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. Hiura H, Komiyama J, Shirai M, Obata Y, Ogawa H, Kono T (2007) DNA methylation imprints on the IG-DMR of the Dlk1-Gtl2 domain in mouse male germline. FEBS Letters 581:1255–1260CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. Jiang S, Bailey AS, Goldman DC, Swain JR, Wong MH, Streeter PR, Fleming WH (2008) Hematopoietic stem cells contribute to lymphatic endothelium. PLoS ONE 3:e3812–e3819CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. Koerner TJ, Myers AM, Lee S, Tzagoloff A (1987) Isolation and characterization of the yeast gene coding for the α subunit of mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase*. J Biol Chem 262:3690–3696PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. Medvinsky A, Dzierzak E (1996) Definitive hematopoiesis is autonomously initiated by the AGM region. Cell 86:897–906CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. Nakai M, Takada T, Endo T (1993) Cloning of the YAP19 gene encoding a putative yeast homolog of AP19, the mammalian small chain of the clathrin-assembly proteins. Biochim Biophys Acta 1174:282–284PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. Niu S, Antin PB, Morkin E (1996) Cloning and sequencing of a developmentally regulation avian mRNA containing the LEA motif found in plant seed proteins. Gene 175:187–191CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. Ogawa M (1993) Differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic stem cells. Blood 81:2844–2853PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Peters BA, Diaz LA, Polyak K, Meszler L, Romans K, Guinan EC, Antin JH, Myerson D, Hamilton SR, Vogelstein B, Kinzler KW, Lengauer C (2005) Contribution of bone marrow-derived endothelial cells to human tumor vasculature. Nat Med 11:261–262CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. Sanni A, Walter P, Boulanger Y, Ebel JP, Fasiolo F (1991) Evolution of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase quaternary structure and activity: Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial phenylalanyl-tRNA synthetase. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88:8387–8391CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. Schmidt HA, Strimmer K, Vingron M, von Haeseler A (2002) TREE-PUZZLE: maximum likelihood phylogenetic analysis using quartets and parallel computing. Bioinformatics 18:502–504CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Sesaki H, Dunn CD, Lijima M, Shepard KA, Yaffe MP, Machamer CE, Jensen RE (2006) Ups1p, a conserved intermembrane space protein, regulates mitochondrial shape and alternative topogenesis of Mgm1p. J Cell Biol 173:651–658CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Srinivasan RS, Dillard ME, Lagutin OV, Lin FJ, Tsai S, Tsai MJ, Samokhvalov IM, Oliver G (2007) Lineage tracing demonstrates the venous origin of the mammalian lymphatic vasculature. Genes Dev 21:2422–2432CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. Stacey RA, Aalen RB (1998) Identification of sequence homology between the internal hydrophilic repeated motifs of group 1 late-embryogenesis-abundant proteins in plants and hydrophilic repeats of the general stress protein GsiB of Bacillus Subtilis. Planta 206:476–478CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Tahvanainen J, Kallonen T, Lahteenmaki H, Heiskanen KM, Westermarck J, Rao KVS, Lahesmaa R (2009) PRELI is a mitochondrial regulator of human primary T helper cell apoptosis, STAT6 and Th2 cell differentiation. Blood 113:1268–1277CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  21. Takada S, Paulsen M, Tevendale M, Tsai CE, Kelsey G, Cattanach BM, Ferguson-Smith AC (2002) Epigenetic analysis of the Dlk1-Gtl2 imprinted domain on mouse chromosome 12: implications for imprinting control from comparison with Igf2-H19. Hum Mol Genet 11:77–86CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  22. Takeuchi M, Sekiguchi T, Hara T, Kinoshita T, Miyajima A (2002) Cultivation of aorta-gonad-mesonephros- derived hematopoietic stem cells in the fetal liver microenvironment amplifies long-term repopulating activity and enhances engraftment to the bone marrow. Blood 99:1190–1196CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. Tamura Y, Endo T, Iijima M, Sesaki H (2009) Ups1p and Ups2p antagonistically regulate cardiolipin metabolism in mitochondria. J Cell Biol 185:1029–1045CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  24. Wu Q, Kumagai T, Kawahara M, Ogawa H, Hiura H, Obata Y, Takano R, Kono T (2006) Regulated expression of two sets of paternally imprinted genes is necessary for mouse parthenogenetic development to term. Reproduction 131:481–488CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Zuccotti M, Monk M (1995) Methylation of the mouse Xist gene in sperm and eggs correlates with imprinted Xist expression and paternal X-inactivation. Nat Genet 9:316–320CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mengya Gao
    • 1
  • Qi Liu
    • 1
  • Fengwei Zhang
    • 1
  • Zhengbin Han
    • 1
  • Tiantian Gu
    • 1
  • Weiming Tian
    • 1
  • Yan Chen
    • 1
  • Qiong Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Life Science and EngineeringHarbin Institute of TechnologyHeilongjiangChina

Personalised recommendations