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Higher Education

, Volume 51, Issue 4, pp 521–539 | Cite as

Internationalization of Curricula in Higher Education Institutions in Comparative Perspectives: Case Studies of China, Japan and The Netherlands

  • Futao Huang
Article

Abstract

This article discusses the major issues and character of internationalization of curricula in higher education institutions in recent years in three non-English-speaking countries – China, Japan and The Netherlands. By making a comparative analysis of curricula provided for international students and curricula with international subjects, perspectives or approach offered in both English and the local language, the author examines development and character of internationalized curricula in the three countries, describes the similarities and different aspects of how the three countries internationalized their university curricula and met the needs of different regions and social, economic and higher education systems.

Keywords

China comparative perspective internationalization of university curriculum Japan and The Netherlands 

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Copyright information

© Springer 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Institute for Higher EducationHiroshima UniversityHigashi HiroshimaJapan

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