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HEC Forum

, Volume 16, Issue 4, pp 297–316 | Cite as

Shared leadership: The freedom to do bioethics

  • Dawn Dudley Oosterhoff
  • Mary Rowell
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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dawn Dudley Oosterhoff
  • Mary Rowell

There are no affiliations available

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