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Health Care Analysis

, Volume 13, Issue 4, pp 303–313 | Cite as

Looking for the Meaning of Dignity in the Bioethics Convention and the Cloning Protocol

  • Daniela-Ecaterina Cutas
Article

Abstract

This paper is focused on the analysis of two documents (the Council of Europe's Bioethics Convention and the Additional Cloning Protocol) inasmuch as they refer to the relationship between human dignity and human genetic engineering. After presenting the stipulations of the abovementioned documents, I will review various proposed meanings of human dignity and will try to identify which of these seem to be at the core of their underlying assumptions. Is the concept of dignity proposed in the two documents coherent? Is it morally legitimate? Is it, as some might assume, of Kantian origin? Does it have any philosophical roots?

Key Words

human dignity human nature moral value liberty freedom of choice 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science + Business Media, Inc. 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of Political ScienceNational School of Political Studies and Public AdministrationBucharestRomania
  2. 2.NSPSPABucharest

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