Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 85, Issue 1, pp 165–170 | Cite as

Application of sulfur fertilizer reduces cadmium accumulation and toxicity in tobacco seedlings (Nicotiana tabacum)

  • Xue Feng
  • Wenxing Liu
  • Shafaque Sehar
  • Weite Zheng
  • Guoping Zhang
  • Feibo Wu
Brief communication
  • 188 Downloads

Abstract

Greenhouse pot experiments were carried out to illuminate the mitigation effects of sulfur (S) on cadmium (Cd) uptake and toxicity in tobacco using two levels of exogenous sulfur of S1 and S2 containing 47 and 38% total S. Results showed that Cd1 and Cd2 treatments of 1 and 5 mg Cd kg−1 soil increased leaf Cd concentration and accumulation but reduced plant height, net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and biomass, with a much severe response in Cd2 treatment. Application of S2 fertilizer alleviates Cd toxicity, markedly decreased Cd concentration and improved photosynthesis, compared with Cd1 and Cd2 alone treatment; but S1 only alleviated Cd toxicity when tobacco was subjected to Cd1 stress. Our results suggest that S2 fertilizer was more effective in reducing Cd accumulation and toxicity in Tobacco than S1, and highlights a promising approach of S fertilizer application to lower leaf Cd accumulation in order to ensure product safety of tobacco grown in Cd polluted soils.

Keywords

Cadmium Pollution Sulfur Photosynthesis Alleviation Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xue Feng
    • 1
  • Wenxing Liu
    • 1
  • Shafaque Sehar
    • 1
  • Weite Zheng
    • 1
  • Guoping Zhang
    • 1
  • Feibo Wu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Agronomy and Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Crop Germplasm, College of Agriculture and BiotechnologyZijingang Campus, Zhejiang UniversityHangzhouPeople’s Republic of China

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