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Plant Growth Regulation

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 87–92 | Cite as

Antioxidative responses and their relation to salt tolerance in Echinochloa oryzicola Vasing and Setaria virdis (L.) Beauv.

  • Yeonghoo Kim
  • Joji Arihara
  • Takuji Nakayama
  • Norikazu Nakayama
  • Shinji Shimada
  • Kenji Usui
Article

Abstract

Two gramineous species among wild plants, Echinochloa oryzicola Vasing and Setaria viridis (L.) Beauv., and Oryza sativa L. cv. Nipponbare were subjected to salt stress. The relative growth rate (RGR), Na content, photosynthetic rate, antioxidant enzymes activity (superoxide disumutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APx) and glutathione reductase (GR)), and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in leaves after NaCl treatment were studied. RGR significantly decreased in O. sativa more than in E. oryzicola and S. viridis. Comparatively salt-tolerant S. viridis showed higher growth rate, lower Na accumulation rate in leaves, higher photosynthetic rate, and induced more SOD, CAT, APx, and GR activity and lower increase of MDA content as compared to the salt-sensitive O. sativa. At the same time, the comparatively salt-tolerant E. oryzicola also showed higher growth rate, much lower Na accumulation and no observable increase of MDA content, even though the CAT and APx activities were not induced by salinity. These results suggested that the scavenging system induced by H2O2-mediated oxidative damage might, at least in part, play an important role in the mechanism of salt tolerance against cell toxicity of NaCl in some gramineous plants

APx CAT Echinochloa oryzicola GR Salt tolerance Setaria viridis SOD 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yeonghoo Kim
    • 1
  • Joji Arihara
    • 1
  • Takuji Nakayama
    • 1
  • Norikazu Nakayama
    • 1
  • Shinji Shimada
    • 1
  • Kenji Usui
    • 1
  1. 1.Legume Physiology LaboratoryNational Institute of Crop ScienceJapan

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