Advertisement

Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution

, Volume 61, Issue 1, pp 267–272 | Cite as

Genetic diversity assessment for Eugenia uniflora L., E. pyriformis Cambess., E. brasiliensis Lam. and E. francavilleana O. Berg neotropical tree species (Myrtaceae) with heterologous SSR markers

  • Ronai Ferreira-Ramos
  • Klaus Alvaro Guerrieri Accoroni
  • Ariany Rossi
  • Marcela Corbo Guidugli
  • Moacyr Antonio Mestriner
  • Carlos Alberto Martinez
  • Ana Lilia Alzate-Marin
Notes on Neglected and Underutilized Crops

Abstract

In this study, a set of nuclear microsatellite markers were transferred and characterized from two Myrtaceae sub-families to four neotropical Eugenia fruit tree species (E. uniflora L., E. pyriformis Cambess., E. brasiliensis Lam. and E. francavilleana O. Berg), which are neglected and underutilized foods of great ecological and potential economic value found in the Atlantic forest regions of South America. Leaf samples of mature E. uniflora, E. pyriformis, E. brasiliensis and E. francavilleana trees, which are popularly termed “pitanga”, “uvaia”, “grumixama” and “guamirim”, respectively, were collected from two areas greatly impacted by the agricultural practices of the sugar cane industry in the state of São Paulo in the southeastern region of Brazil. A total of 19 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from the Myrtaceae sub-families Leptospermoideae and Myrtoideae were tested, and 15 polymorphic heterologous SSR markers were identified. The expected heterozygosities for E. uniflora, E. pyriformis, E. brasiliensis and E. francavilleana were 0.64, 0.75, 0.54 and 0.71, respectively. These results suggest that these SSR markers may be useful for population genetic studies. A total of 4, 9, 11 and 4 heterologous SSR polymorphic markers for E. uniflora, E. pyriformis, E. brasiliensis and E. francavilleana, respectively, are now available for genetic diversity, gene flow and mating system analyses in these species.

Keywords

Eugenia uniflora E. pyriformis E. brasiliensis E. francavilleana Forest conservation Genetic diversity Heterologous SSR Neglected and underutilized fruit trees 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This study was supported by Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de São Paulo (FAPESP, Grant #03/04199-4 to ALAM), Provost for Research of São Paulo University (ALAM), Fundação de Apoio ao Ensino, Pesquisa e Assistência (FAEPA) (MAM) and CAPES-PROEX grants. RFR, KAGA, AR and MCG were supported by FAPESP (Grants 08/01559-3, 08/04121-9, 09/02714-5 and 07/04787-4, respectively). ALAM was supported by a research assistantship from FAPESP (2004/01378-8) and CNPq (PD Senior 150277/2009-1, PV 300140/2011-8). CAM is fellow CNPq researcher. The authors thank Antônio Justino da Silva (PCARP/USP), Marcelo Antonio de Pinho Ferreira and Vanderlei Aparecido Alves de Miranda (Laboratório de Ecologia e Restauração Florestal (LERF), Departamento de Ciências Biológicas da ESALQ/USP) for collaboration regarding sample collections.

References

  1. Alzate-Marin AL, Guidugli MC, Soriani HH, Martinez CA, Mestriner MA (2009) An efficient and rapid DNA minipreparation procedure suitable for PCR/SSR and RAPD analyses in tropical forest tree species. Braz Arch Biol Technol 52:1217–1224. doi: 10.1590/S1516-89132009000500021 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Amorim B, Alves M (2012) Myrtaceae from lowland Atlantic forest areas in the State of Pernambuco, Northeastern Brazil. Phytotaxa 40:33–54Google Scholar
  3. Brondani RPV, Brondani C, Tarchini R, Grattapaglia D (1998) Development, characterization and mapping of microsatellite markers in Eucalyptus grandis and E. Urophylla. Theor Appl Genet 97:816–827CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Byrne M, Marquez-Garcia MI, Uren T, Smith DS, Moran GF (1996) Conservation and genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in the genus Eucalyptus. Aust J Bot 44:331–341. doi: 10.1071/BT9960331 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chase M, Kesseli R, Bawa K (1996) Microsatellite markers for population and conservation genetics of tropical trees. AJB 83:51–57Google Scholar
  6. Feres JM, Martinez MLL, Martinez CA, Mestriner MA, Alzate-Marin AL (2009) Transferability and characterization of nine microsatellite markers for the tropical tree species Tabebuia roseo-alba. Mol Ecol Res 9:434–437. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2008.02483.x Google Scholar
  7. Ferreira-Ramos R, Laborda PR, Santos MO, Mayor MS, Mestriner MA, Souza AP, Alzate-Marin AL (2008) Genetic analyses of three populations of Eugenia uniflora L. through of newly developed SSR markers for Eugenia uniflora L. Conserv Genet 9:1281–1285. doi: 10.1007/s10592-007-9458-0 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Goudet J (1995) FSTAT Version 1.2: a computer program to calculate F-statistics. J. Heredity 86: 485-486. FSTAT 2.9.3.2 [Software] available from: http://www2.unil.ch/popgen/softwares/fstat.htm. Accessed 1 Feb 2013
  9. Govaerts R, Sobral M, Ashton P, Barrie F, et al. (2010) World Checklist of Myrtaceae. The Board of Trustees of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Published on the Internet: http://www.kew.org/wcsp/. Accessed 31 Jan 2013
  10. Guidugli MC, Accoroni KAG, Mestriner MA, Contel EPB, Martinez CA, Alzate-Marin AL (2010) Genetic characterization of 12 heterologous microsatellite markers for the giant tropical tree Cariniana legalis (Lecythidaceae). Genet Mol Biol 33:131–134. doi: 10.1590/S1415-47572010000100022 PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Guzman F, Almerão MP, Körbes AP, Loss-Morais G, Margis R (2012) Identification of MicroRNAs from Eugenia uniflora by high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics analysis. PLoS One 7:e49811. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0049811 PubMedCentralPubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Lewis PO, Zaykin D (2002) Genetic data analysis: computer program for the analysis of allelic data. http://hydrodictyon.eeb.uconn.edu/people/plewis/software.php. Accessed 1 Feb 2013
  13. Margis R, Felix D, Caldas JF, Salgueiro F et al (2002) Genetic differentiation among three neighboring Brazil-cherry (Eugenia uniflora L.) populations within the Brazilian Atlantic rain Forest. Biodiv conserv 11:149–163CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Nazareno AG, Pereira RAS, Feres JM, Mestriner MA, Alzate-Marin AL (2009) Transferability and characterization of microsatellite markers in two Neotropical Ficus species. Gen Mol Biol 32:568–571. doi: 10.1590%2FS1415-47572009005000056 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Rice WR (1989) Analyzing tables of statistical tests. Evolution 43:223–225CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Rossetto M, McLaucchlan A, Harris FCL, Henry RJ, Baverstock PR, Lee LS, Maguire TL, Edwards KJ (1999) Abundance and polymorphism of microsatellite markers in tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia–Myrtaceae). Theor Appl Genet 98:1091–1098CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Rossetto M, Harris FCL, McLaucchlan A, Henry RJ, Baverstock PR, Lee LS (2000) Interspecific amplification of tea tree (Melaleuca alternifoliaMyrtaceae) microsatellite loci–potencial implications for conservation studies. Aust J Bot 48:367–373CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Santos AF, Silva SM, Alves RE (2006) Storage of suriname cherry under modified atmosphere and refrigeration: I-postharvest chemical changes. Rev Bras Frutic 28:36–41CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Santos KL, Welter LJ, Dantas ACM, Guerra MP, Ducroquet JPHJ, Nodari RO (2007) Transference of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp. to Acca sellowiana and the successful use of this technique in genetic characterization. Genet Mol Biol 30:73–79. doi: 10.1590/S1415-47572007000100014 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Silva SM (2006) Pitanga. Rev Bras Frutic 28:0–0Google Scholar
  21. Silva LC, Oliva MA, Azevedo AA, Araújo JM, Aguiar RM (2005) Micromorphological and anatomical alterations caused by simulated acid rain in restinga plants: Eugenia uniflora and Clusia hilariana. Water Air Soil Pollut 168:129–143CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sobral M, Proença C, Souza M, Mazine F, Lucas E (2013) Myrtaceae in Lista de Espécies da Flora do Brasil. Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro. (http://floradobrasil.jbrj.gov.br/jabot/floradobrasil/FB10338). Accessed 30 May 2013
  23. Zucchi MI, Brondani RPV, Pinheiro JB, Brondani C, Vencovsky R (2002) Transferability of microsatellite markers from Eucalyptus spp. to Eugenia dysenterica (Myrtaceae family). Mol Ecol Notes 2:512–513. doi: 10.1046/j.1471-8286.2002.00297.x CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronai Ferreira-Ramos
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Klaus Alvaro Guerrieri Accoroni
    • 1
  • Ariany Rossi
    • 1
    • 3
  • Marcela Corbo Guidugli
    • 1
    • 4
  • Moacyr Antonio Mestriner
    • 1
  • Carlos Alberto Martinez
    • 2
    • 3
  • Ana Lilia Alzate-Marin
    • 1
    • 4
  1. 1.Laboratório de Genética Vegetal, Departamento de Genética, Bloco B, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão PretoUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Ribeirão PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia ComparadaUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Ribeirão PretoBrazil
  3. 3.Departamento de BiologiaUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Ribeirão PretoBrazil
  4. 4.Programa de Pós-Graduação em GenéticaUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)Ribeirão PretoBrazil

Personalised recommendations