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Genetic Resources and Crop Evolution

, Volume 59, Issue 7, pp 1349–1356 | Cite as

Geographical variation and quality assessment of Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville within Brazil

  • Valéria S. Corrêa
  • Antonio L. Cerdeira
  • Ana L. Fachin
  • Bianca W. Bertoni
  • Paulo S. Pereira
  • Suzelei C. França
  • Henrique G. Momm
  • Rita M. Moraes
  • Ana M. S. Pereira
Research Article

Abstract

Stryphnodendron adstringens (Mart.) Coville belongs to the Mimosoideae subfamily of the Leguminosae, and is also known as Barbatimão. It is extensively used in the traditional Brazilian medicine for its biological properties, which are attributed to the tannin fraction found in the bark. To maintain the genetic diversity of S. adstringens we have accessed twelve populations to establish an ex situ germplasm bank for future collections of seeds. Records on geographical boundary of occurrence, fruits, seeds and levels of extractions were gathered as species descriptors. Aiming the tannin fractions, we have noticed extraction of the bark on 46% of the evaluated trees as a practice that partially removes the bark disrupting wood vessels and causing premature death of the trees. In addition, the quality of seeds was low due to the high incidence of insect attack and immature abortion which compromises the species reproductive pattern. The geographical variation on the tannin content, seed production, predation and abortion was studied in twelve distinct populations located in three different states São Paulo, Goiás and Minas Gerais. Populations with the highest content of phenols and tannins were Campo Alegre and Luislândia. Our data demonstrated that there is a need for conservation of S. adstringens. Plants of the population located in Campo Alegre and Luislândia were considered elite for non-timber products of S. adstringens.

Keywords

Barbatimão Cerrado Medicinal plant Ex situ conservation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Valéria S. Corrêa
    • 1
  • Antonio L. Cerdeira
    • 2
  • Ana L. Fachin
    • 1
  • Bianca W. Bertoni
    • 1
  • Paulo S. Pereira
    • 1
  • Suzelei C. França
    • 1
  • Henrique G. Momm
    • 3
  • Rita M. Moraes
    • 4
    • 5
  • Ana M. S. Pereira
    • 1
  1. 1.Plant Biotechnology CenterUniversity of Ribeirão Preto, UNAERPRibeirão PretoBrazil
  2. 2.Brazilian Department of AgricultureEmbrapa/EnvironmentJaguariúnaBrazil
  3. 3.USDA/ARS, National Sedimentation LaboratoryOxfordUSA
  4. 4.National Center for Natural Products ResearchThe University of MississippiUniversityUSA
  5. 5.Center for Water and Wetland ResourcesThe University of MississippiAbbevilleUSA

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