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AFLP analysis of genetic diversity in leafy kale (Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala (DC.) Alef.) landraces, cultivars and wild populations in Europe

Abstract

AFLP markers were used to characterize diversity and asses the genetic structure among 17 accessions of kale landraces, cultivars and wild populations from Europe. The range of average gene diversity in accessions was 0.11–0.27. Several landraces showed higher levels of diversity than the wild populations and one cultivar had the lowest diversity measures. The landraces that were most genetically diverse were from areas where kales are known to be extensively grown, suggesting in situ conservation in these areas as a supplement to storage of seeds in gene banks. An analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed that 62% of the total variation was found within accessions. For most accessions, genetic distance was not related to geographic distance. Similarities among accessions were probably not caused by recent gene flow since they were widely separated geographically; more likely the relationship among them is due to seed dispersal through human interactions. Our results indicate that a kale population found in a natural habitat in Denmark was probably not truly wild but most likely an escape from a cultivated Danish kale that had subsequently become naturalized.

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Acknowledgments

This research was financially supported by the Nilsson-Ehle Foundation (The Royal Physiographic Society in Lund), and by the Erik Philip-Sörensen Foundation.

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Correspondence to Rikke Bagger Jørgensen.

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Christensen, S., von Bothmer, R., Poulsen, G. et al. AFLP analysis of genetic diversity in leafy kale (Brassica oleracea L. convar. acephala (DC.) Alef.) landraces, cultivars and wild populations in Europe. Genet Resour Crop Evol 58, 657–666 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10722-010-9607-z

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Keywords

  • Brassica oleracea
  • Genetic resources
  • Molecular markers
  • Genetic differentiation