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Glass and Ceramics

, Volume 71, Issue 5–6, pp 169–171 | Cite as

Formation of the Crystalline Structure of a Silicon Surface in Active Media During Polishing

  • A. A. Kanaev
  • A. E. Gorodetskii
Materials Processing

When surfactants are present in polishing compositions severe damage is done to the initial crystal structure of a very thin (tenths and hundredths of a micron thick) surface layer of the material (silicon) being processed and the deformation-strength properties of the material change as a result of the Rebinder effect. The use of active additives in polishing compositions, including unconventional ones, makes it possible to decrease the thickness of the damaged layer by a factor of 1.5 – 2, significantly increasing the polishing efficiency in the process.

Key words

silicon polishing Rebinder effect 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.A. N. Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and ElectrochemistryRussian Academy of SciencesMoscowRussia

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