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Glass and Ceramics

, Volume 70, Issue 11–12, pp 404–408 | Cite as

Effect of Aluminum Hydrosol Additives and an Electromagnetic Field on the Structure and Technical Properties of Clayey Minerals

  • I. A. Zhenzhurist
  • A. N. Bogdanov
Article
  • 46 Downloads

The effect of nanosize hydrosols and organic xerogels of aluminum oxide on the properties of water suspensions modified by nanosols of bentonite and refractory clays is studied. The dependence of the properties of modified bentonite and refractory compositions on the type of nanosol and the effect of an electromagnetic field is studied according to the change in the increase and fluidity of the slip, the structure of the sol and the shrinkage and strength of fired samples.

Key words

nanodisperse particles aluminum oxide hydrosol and organic aluminum sol water suspensions of bentonite and refractory clay structure of sols properties of molding mixture and fired samples electromagnetic field 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Kazan State Civil Engineering UniversityKazan’Russia

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